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Due to unforeseen circumstances, the July 29th dance has been canceled.

 

We are sorry to announce that the Putnam County Commission has voted to take away 10,000 of our funding this year. Thank you to those who support our efforts. God bless.

Our funding from the County was $39,170 and is now $29,170

Herald Citizen’s article by Jim Herrin

(Pertaining to the Putnam County Senior Citizens)……….
Savage’s motion took out $5,000 the county had allocated to Plateau Mental Health Center and reduced the county’s contribution to the Cookeville Senior Center by $10,000. It was approved on a 15-6 vote, with commissioners Larry Redwine, Benton Young, Jimmy Neal, Tony Honeycutt and Donny Buttram voting against it.

Senior center director Maxine Frasier was at the meeting and stood up to speak, but was not recognized by the commission chair.

In its discussions this year, the budget committee had initially cut, but then later restored, $10,000 to the senior center’s budget. As approved, the county’s contribution for 2017-18 will now be $74,170.

 

While Maxine was attending the City Council Meeting on Thursday, July 6, trying to get more space and parking for this facility, several members showed up at the budget committee meeting (whose purpose was to set the tax rate and approve the final budget for the county), with the purpose to complain about the Director.

  1. Stacked the Board.

The Board of Directors selects new board members by voting in a public meeting.  The Director has no vote.  There is good discussion by Board Members regarding items on the agenda; but in the last two years of Board meetings, I do not recall a single dissenting vote at a meeting.

  1. Meetings not open to public.

All meetings of the Board of Directors are open to the public.  Notice is published in the Herald-Citizen and announcement is made on a white board in the Center.

  1. Members have been banned or suspended.

A Code of Conduct has been developed by the Board of Directors.  In five years, three people have been found to violate the Code of Conduct.  One was banned and the report was published in the newspaper years ago.  Two were given short-term suspensions with the option of privileges being restored upon agreeing to abide by the Code of Conduct.

  1. Folks have stopped coming because I don’t treat them good. 

Having been chosen Senior Center of the Year and having served 901 active members in the past 12 months testifies to the fact that we are experiencing growing pains.  From free healthy breakfasts to Bingo every day, the goal of staff is to provide a welcoming atmosphere for everyone.  Larger numbers demanding new activities in scarce space with limited parking frustrates some participants who remember a different time; but with a positive attitude, there is something for everyone to enjoy.  Other stressors are instituted through funding agencies.  Example:  Lunch has been offered four days a week for a donation.  Recently, the Area Agency on Aging changed that to five days a week, which is a good thing for low-income and disadvantaged participants.  The negative result from that positive action was the loss of our monthly covered dish luncheon which caused some folks to be upset.  Many seniors are moving to this area, and we are dedicated to serving each one with kindness and respect.

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Seniors voice complaints about center director

Posted Monday, July 10, 2017

BY JIM HERRIN

A group of senior citizens attended Thursday’s budget committee meeting to voice their disapproval of the job that Cookeville Senior Center Director Maxine Frasier has been doing.

The committee had already adjourned when former county commissioner Anna Ruth Burroughs asked members to hear from the senior citizens group.

“Does this affect the budget?” asked committee member Tom Short.

If you gave Mrs. Frasier $10,000, yes, it does,” Burroughs replied.

She then introduced 90-year-old Opal Bohannon, who said she had been going to the center “for years.”

“The first two years Maxine was elected our director, she done good,” Bohannon said. “But the last two years, things have (been) different, There’s people that used to go there that won’t come now because she’s not been treating people fair.”

Bohannon and others claimed that Frasier had “stacked the board” of the senior center in her favor, allowing her to make changes that several members disagreed with.

They also claimed that members were not allowed to attend some board meetings and that others had been banned or suspended from participating in activities at the center.

In an email to the Herald-Citizen, Frasier said the allegation that she has stacked the board in her favor has no merit.

“The board of directors selects new board members by voting in a public meeting.  The director has no vote,” she said. “There is good discussion by board members regarding items on the agenda; but in the last two years of board meetings, I do not recall a single dissenting vote at a meeting.”

Frasier noted that any suspensions or bans are the result of a policy adopted by the board.

“A code of conduct has been developed by the board of directors.  In five years, three people have been found to violate the code of conduct,” she  said. “One was banned and the report was published in the newspaper years ago.  Two were given short-term suspensions with the option of privileges being restored upon agreeing to abide by the code of conduct.”

Frasier attributed the complaints to “growing pains.”

“Larger numbers demanding new activities in scarce space with limited parking frustrates some participants who remember a different time,” she said.

County commissioner Mike Atwood told seniors who showed up at the budget meeting that he was sympathetic to the issue, but doubted whether the commission had any authority to intervene.

“The county itself has no control over your director. All we do is fund it,” he said. “We can control the money that’s allotted to the center, but that certainly doesn’t help the seniors if we take that money away. There is a formal means by which to address your problem and that is through the system of bylaws that you have in place.”

“We feel like a lot of people don’t know what’s going on there because everyone doesn’t go to the center,” said Burroughs. “It’s the nicest center in Putnam County, but when you have someone threatening you and doing all this, no one wants to go and put up with all that.”

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The County Budget Committee voted to overturn the budget cut and restore the same funds received last year!!!! Thank you all for your diligence and support!!! We are so blessed to have such amazing participants and Board members who truly love our activity center❤️God Bless!

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Our Thrift Store is now open M-W-F from 9-1

 

 

 

NYC Group 10x8 Our New York City tour was a success!!!

 

Our FaceBook page is updated daily. We add videos and photo’s as they happen.  https://www.facebook.com/cookevilleseniorcenter  (Must be logged into FaceBook to view)

 

WE NOW OFFER LUNCH MONDAY-FRIDAY!!!

 

Thanks to the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, we now have a brand new 14 passenger bus! We will post at least 2 trips a month on the bulletin board for sign up.

Another special thanks to the Community Foundation for a healthy breakfast option grant! Every morning we now offer a healthy breakfast option, free of charge!

 

 

 

(Click Flyer to Enlarge^^^^^^^^^)

Chattanooga day trip 2017

Our first overnight day trip to Chattanooga was a success!!!

 

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